That Little Agency https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk Tue, 12 Mar 2019 08:09:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.2 Making sure Google can find your careers website and vacancies https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/making-sure-google-can-find-your-careers-website-and-vacancies/ Sat, 02 Mar 2019 11:50:37 +0000 https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/?p=5514 You’ve worked hard to build your careers website. It looks good, it’s got all your latest roles on there too, even a nice video. But, if your site could speak,...

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You’ve worked hard to build your careers website. It looks good, it’s got all your latest roles on there too, even a nice video. But, if your site could speak, it might sound a little bit like Lionel Richie.

“Hello, is it me you’re looking for?”

And just like Lionel, it’ll be left wondering where your candidates are, and wondering what they do. That’s because, unless your site and vacancies are set-up right – some other employer will soon be loving them.

So, how can you make sure it’s your site and vacancies they are not only looking for, but actually find? The good news is, as this article will show, a lot of this is easy to do. So let’s start with making sure Google finds your careers website.

Does Google know your careers website is a careers website?

Sometimes it’s the most obvious things that are easy to overlook. The biggest challenge your careers page may face is that Google doesn’t know it’s a careers page. Which won’t do it any favours when it comes to being found. At the very least, the URL of your careers site or pages, should be structured so it starts of ends with something careers, jobs or vacancies. This will help Google know that this is a jobs section and should therefore be indexed as such in search results.

You need to get your careers page and live vacancies set-up so that they are found for the roles they list. Google is very helpful when it comes to this. It publishes directions so that you can set-up job postings to be better found in Google searches, leading to the posts having increased chances of discovery and conversion.

How to do this

These three links will give your site and its vacancies a big splash of SEO juice and ensure they are indexed by Google and Indeed which costs nothing. If you aren’t IT savvy or don’t have access to your site back end, you might want to get your IT department to help. It should be easy for them to follow.

Are you set-up for Google for Jobs?

Google for Jobs has been live in the UK for a few months now. It has been designed to simplify and speed up the process of job hunting for job seekers. If you are set-up for Google for Jobs, then your roles will appear in Google’s job search box by matching what your candidates have been searching for. Which sounds like a pretty good idea to us.

Some employers are reporting a 60% increase in job views as a result of being set-up for Google for Jobs. So you’ll want to get a copy of ‘Our little guide to Google for Jobs’ ebook.

Are your job postings written to be found?

Of course they are – or so you might think. But Google likes things laid out in a logical way. A cut and paste of the job description won’t be enough. If you want to be friends with Google (and job boards in general) – you have to play by their rules. What’s more, the way you write and structure your job postings will also have a huge impact on how they are found and interpreted by your candidates. And not just any candidates – but the better qualified ones you really want.

This article has all the elements to help you create a well crafted, highly targeted and, most importantly of all, interesting and readable job advert. https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/little-guide-writing-successful-job-advert/

A little more about SEO

Google looks for the same things in a career site that it does in any good website – and that means good SEO practice. With a careers site, indexing and doing all the set-up things we covered above is an absolute must. But what else can you do?

Make it mobile friendly: Google gives preference in searches to sites that are mobile compatible. It’s also a lot easier for your candidates to engage with and find what they want. If your careers site isn’t mobile friendly, you’ll be losing candidates full stop. If you have an existing site that isn’t mobile friendly, a new careers site is the time to change things. Here’s something we wrote on mobile applications – it’ll give you some pointers.

Check it loads fast: Your candidates don’t like to wait – and nor does Google. You only have a matter of seconds to encourage your candidates to stick with you and read more. If your site loads any slower than 3 seconds you may already have lost up to 40% of potential visitors. You can run your careers site through Google’s mobile site speed checker. Anything more than 2.5 seconds is considered slow. You’ll get a report with recommended fixes.

Add fresh content: Every day Google crawls the web looking for signs of new content. It tells Google that your site is alive and well. So, adding well structured content with relevant keywords to your careers site will help get it noticed and give your candidates fresh reasons to interact with your employer brand. So, as well as your vacancies, think about blog articles, testimonials from staff, videos – there’s a lot you can do with content.

Get social: Using social media can add tremendous reach for your careers site. That’s because it’s highly likely that the network of your employees and their friends and contacts  is much bigger than yours as an employer. Yes, there’s an audience for your careers site – but there’s a much bigger one if you use social media and link it back to your site. What’s more, social media is where employees and candidates will be talking, so you might as well join in the conversation. This post covers how social media will support your employer brand.

In conclusion

You don’t need to be an SEO expert to bring good SEO to your careers site. This article has covered most of the basics you’ll need to help your site and vacancies have a much better chance of being found.

In summary, if your careers site has well indexed and written pages, well structured job postings (and clear job titles), is set up for Google for Jobs, is mobile friendly, loads quickly, has fresh content and uses the right keywords (pause for breath)… then you are doing many of the right things.

Is it us you’re looking for?

We are That Little Agency, we help employers tell their story and we do this by developing award-winning employer brands and careers websites. If you feel that you’d like some help, support or even a little chat around defining your employer value proposition, developing your employer brand or any aspect of your talent attraction strategy just drop us a line. After all, much of our best work has started with a cup of tea and a biscuit.

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Google Analytics, your careers website and your candidates https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/google-analytics-and-your-careers-website/ Sun, 13 Jan 2019 09:00:43 +0000 https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/?p=5459 As a Talent Acquisition or Recruitment Manager, you know that your careers website is the flagship for your employer brand and resourcing strategy. It sets out your employee value proposition,...

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As a Talent Acquisition or Recruitment Manager, you know that your careers website is the flagship for your employer brand and resourcing strategy. It sets out your employee value proposition, hosts your vacancies and, if all goes well, inspires your candidates to apply. All pretty important stuff – we think so. So, of course you are measuring its performance – aren’t you?

You should already have a pretty good idea of the effectiveness of your resourcing strategy if you track the time it takes to fill roles, the quality of both your hires and speculative applicants. But Google Analytics will give you specific data about your careers website itself – so you’ll be able to gather more information and track ROI on sources of candidate traffic including job boards, social media and employee review sites like Glassdoor.

What’s more, a careers website and associated media is no small investment – so you really don’t want to miss out on the important (and free) data that Google Analytics can give you.

With a little help from us – you could be up and running in no time. You’ll find an overview of some of the key data Google Analytics will give you, some tips on how to get started and some useful guides at the end.

Think like a Marketing Manager

You might be in resourcing but it’s time to think like a Marketing Manager. That’s because, today, you are a marketing manager – for your employer brand. So, just as a marketing manager needs customer data to evaluate tactics and make decisions – it’s no different for your careers website.

If you already think of your candidates as customers of your employment offer – then you are on the right track and Google Analytics, if you aren’t using it already – will be a revelation.

Key career site measures from Google Analytics

Here are some of the main measures and what they cover. Google Analytics data is grouped into four main sections. We’ve structured this to show some of the main data you can look out for in each – and what it means.

Audience

Audience tells you everything you need to know about the people who visit your careers website. You can see how many there’s been, where they came from, how long they stay and the devices they use. In particular:

  • Users. How many users visited your careers website in any date range – and you can also see a real-real-time version of this.
  • New users. The number of first-time users during a selected date range. This is useful if you want to see the impact of a campaign in attracting new candidates.
  • Page views. The total number of pages visitors accessed on your careers website.
  • Pages and session. The average number of pages one user looked at in one session.
  • Bounce rate. The percentage of people who just visited one page of your careers website and then left. The higher the figure, the less engaging the site is. Ideally, a figure lower than 50% shows that at least half your visitors wanted to explore the site further.
  • Device category. The type of devices being used – desktop, mobile and tablet. Candidates habits are becoming increasingly mobile – so a low visitor rate via mobiles might indicate a poor mobile experience.

Typically, we look at the average session duration and the average number of pages viewed per session as an indication of how engaging your careers website is. The higher the number the greater the engagement. It may not be perfect, but it is a good rule of thumb.

Acquisition

Acquisition tells you how people found and arrived at your careers website – including the channels they used, results from using Google AdWords and your presence on social media. In particular:

  • Top channels. You’ll see the percentage coming via organic search, direct (I.e. they typed in your URL), referral from other sites (perhaps Glassdoor or sites where you are spending money), visits from social media and any that come via an email campaign you may have run – perhaps to your candidate database.
  • Google Ads. You can track the results of any paid campaign you use to promote your careers site
  • Keywords. The words your candidates are using (both paid and unpaid) to search for and find your careers website.

Typically, we look at the proportion of your visitors that come directly to your website or via organic search engine searches as being good indicators of your employer brand. Another good indicator are visits via organic social media activity. And of course the more traffic that comes through these sources will reduce your need for paid-for advertising. Which can only be a good thing.

Behaviour

Behaviour covers how people interact with your careers website once they have arrived. Find out the pages and content they viewed, the landing pages, where they went next and the site speed. In particular:

  • Site content. Where they enter the site (landing pages – so you can see what first encouraged them to visit)) and where they leave (exit pages).
  • Site speed. Candidates, and especially those using mobiles, will not want a slow site experience. Pages taking too long to load will likely deter them from exploring your careers website further. You can also test (and gain feedback) on your career website speed here: https://testmysite.withgoogle.com/intl/en-gb

Conversions

This is the part where you get to customise your reporting and ask Google Analytics to give you specific data you set. These are known as ‘goals’. In particular:

  • Applicants. You might want to set up a goal to track the candidates that click to apply, and then those that go onto complete their application. You can set a goal to measure this against each source media – so, you’d soon see which media is working best in terms of actually generating applications.
  • Sign-ups. You can set a goal to measure the success of any sign-up initiatives – like receiving your job alerts or joining your candidate database – and you can also see which media generated these.

Setting up Google Analytics on your careers site

Setting up Google Analytics is easy and free. You just need to have a Gmail account in place. Set-up requires a code to be added to your careers website – so, you’d need access to the back office in order to do this – and this is something probably best managed by your IT department. They would then authorise access to nominated individuals in the resourcing team.

Using Google Analytics

Google Analytics is very intuitive and easy to use and, while Google provides tutorials, you’ll find that the data is fairly easy to interpret. If you take our key careers website measures above as a guide to what to look out for, you’ll soon find interesting data. A couple of things to point out.

Google Analytics only gives data from when it has been set-up so, it will take a few weeks to gather meaningful data. It won’t immediately give you retrospective data. Using Google Analytics can’t break your careers website! You can use it to take a look at data, generate reports but it won’t make any difference to what your careers website looks like – so go on – have a go!

Useful guides

While we hope that we have answered all your questions, there are bund to be a few more. These may just help.

  • Google’s Analytics help page. Everything you need to know about set-up and interpreting your reports. Find out more here.
  • Guide to Google for Jobs. Our free guide on how to ensure your careers website is indexed so that your roles are found in Google searches. We strongly recommend that you are set-up to use Google for Jobs. Find out more here.
  • Launching your new careers website. If you’ve yet to launch your own careers website, Google Analytics will be a tad ahead of the game. But, why not use our roadmap for launching your new careers website the right way. Find out more here.

Conclusion

That’s it – you got there! I hope we’ve been able to help you understand and work with Google Analytics a little better. Going back to that Marketing Manager analogy, recruitment is about customer data – you need to know what your customers are doing so you can evaluate strategy and make decisions.

Once you’ve installed Google Analytics on your careers website you can track the main metrics and customise sections to set up and track your own goals. You’ll be a pro in no time. If you feel that you’d like some help, support or even a little chat around Google Analytics just drop us a line

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A little guide to your proposition, your brand and your marketing https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/employer-value-proposition-employer-brand/ Mon, 19 Nov 2018 09:35:56 +0000 https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/?p=5242 We’ve been kicking the idea for this blog for a little while now. A short piece around the difference between employer value proposition, employer branding and recruitment marketing. Just a...

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We’ve been kicking the idea for this blog for a little while now. A short piece around the difference between employer value proposition, employer branding and recruitment marketing. Just a few thoughts to help add a little clarity around these popular subjects.

It comes from the fact that many of our conversations with clients start something like this. “Mark, we need to develop an employer brand”. That’s not that surprising when you consider that 60% of the traffic to our website comes from people searching for ‘employer branding agency’. But, as popular as the term is, it’s not necessarily one that we’re comfortable with. After all, we’re not a factory that creates employer brands. What we do is discover what it is that makes you a great place to work and turn this into meaningful marketing that will, in turn, influence your reputation as an employer. This helps develop your employer brand.

“An employer brand can be neither created nor destroyed, but it can be influenced from one state to another.” The first law of employer branding. See, that chemistry degree hasn’t been wasted.

And that’s where we need to start. Finding out what state it is in now. Because by knowing what your reputation as an employer is now, and how if differs from the reality of working for you, we’ll know what work needs to be done to get you to where you want to be. And what we’ll need to do enhance and influence your reputation.

So the question becomes slightly different, “Mark, we want to attract, engage and retain the very best talent in our sector. How do we do that?” Great question. I’m glad you asked. I’ll explain.

Let’s start with your employer value proposition

Defining your employer value proposition, or EVP, is essentially finding the answer to this simple question:

“Why should someone choose to work for us, as opposed to someone else?”

Without knowing the answer to this question, how could you possibly hope to meet the expectations of you target job seekers? Your proposition should be the foundations that your talent acquisition strategy is built upon. And you can’t build anything without strong foundations. See, that engineering degree hasn’t been wasted.

By talking to people inside and outside of your business, you can quickly get a good idea of the things that make you a great place to work. Universal themes that can be supported through the experiences of your people. Compelling stories that can be used to build meaningful employer marketing.

Whether you like it or not you already have an employer brand

What? We haven’t done anything; how can we have one? Oh, but you have. Your employer brand is what people already think of you as an employer. They’re forming an opinion about you right now. And you don’t even need to work for an organisation to have a view of their employer brand. It’s often down to perception. Something they’ve heard or seen. Just as you might have a view about a shop or restaurant. But the good news is that you can influence that view. But only if you really understand what you have. And that takes us back to the importance of you defining your employer value proposition.

And, as your HR Director will be pleased to hear, it’s not just about attracting talent. A powerful execution of your employer brand also engages and retains existing employees.

So, how do you bring your employer brand to life?

The secret to successful recruitment marketing comes from delivering a compelling creative message to the right candidates – at the right time, in the right place and on the right device. But it’s rarely that simple. Today’s candidate journey is like any other customer journey – and customers tend to be pretty choosy where they spend their money – or, in this context, invest their talent.

A typical customer journey will start with some form of awareness of the product, service or role, then interest may pick up, they’ll start to evaluate what’s on offer, maybe look for some proof and, if it all stacks up, may decide to take things further. So, you can immediately see why nailing your proposition is so important. It will inform so much of the messaging, so it needs to be realistic. Good recruitment marketing needs to attract and nurture candidates through the process using a number of channels, but there are plenty of stages where candidates can lose interest – even after they’ve gone to the trouble of applying (more of that later).

The holy grail of marketing is to create inbound enquiries from customers who are already part way through their purchasing journey and have ‘bought into’ the brand. Recruitment marketing should be no different. Your compelling proposition articulated through your careers website, social media activity, job board advertising and the way you engage your current employees will all raise awareness of your brand and help attract more informed talent.

Your candidate experience – don’t lose them this way

But despite of all of the above, it’s very easy to cancel out all your earlier hard work. How? Just give your candidates a poor experience. It seems crazy to have to say it – but just as shoppers get turned off by poor customer service – candidates will react in very much the same way.

I’ve been working in the recruitment industry for almost 20 years and I’ve seen supply and demand go in cycles. In the ‘olden days’ when demand was low, but candidate supply was high, some employers thought they could get away with treating candidates almost as a nuisance. The successful candidate was deemed lucky to get the job and unsuccessful candidates rarely heard anything. There was never any connection made between a poor candidate experience and how it would damage the candidate’s perception of the overall brand. That was then.

Today, the candidate experience is a whole subset of the employer brand experience and an industry of its own. It’s all about delivering a recruitment process that leaves candidates with a positive impression of you as an employer – whether they are successful or not. Get it right and you’ll create goodwill that retains not only their interest in you as an employer – but potentially their business as a customer too. Get it wrong and they’ll be on Glassdoor and all over social media.

So, how does it all fit together?

Well, your proposition informs your recruitment marketing which in turns influences your employer brand. It captures why your people choose to work for you instead of somewhere else. There will be little gems in there that will feed into your employer brand as well as some things you can address and improve. While your recruitment marketing works to bring your proposition to life and takes the candidate through a journey from consideration towards commitment. Just as conventional marketing does.

But it doesn’t stop there. Your candidate experience needs to be great too. To deliver on the promises you’re making through your recruitment marketing. No matter what the outcome, you need to know that the candidate has enjoyed the experience of engaging with you. That positive experience will improve your reputation. And your reputation as a place to work is your employer brand. See, those 20 years in employer branding and marketing hasn’t been wasted.

If you feel that you’d like some help, support or even a little chat around defining your employer value proposition, developing your employer brand or any aspect of your talent attraction strategy just drop us a line. After all, much of our best work has started with a cup of tea and a biscuit.

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Ted Talks: Health and wellbeing https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/ted-talks-health-and-wellbeing/ Sat, 13 Oct 2018 15:27:32 +0000 https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/?p=5169 So, how was your summer? Relaxing? Chilled? I ate a wasp! I didn’t really mean to. Most flying insects are like flying raisins to me and catching them is a...

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So, how was your summer? Relaxing? Chilled?

I ate a wasp! I didn’t really mean to. Most flying insects are like flying raisins to me and catching them is a challenge I excel at. But, it turns out wasps are more like flying jalapeños! So, to cut a long story short, my throat swelled up and I ended up at the vets for a couple of days while they sorted me out – I nearly died!

So obviously that stopped me trying to catch flying things, right? Wrong!

Despite the fact that I now know that there is a risk of another near-death experience, I’m still happily trying to catch anything that happens to fly in my general direction. But ‘my staff’ tell me that ‘I don’t know any better’ because I am a dog. You lot however, are meant to be more switched on than me, so why are you still doing things that you know are detrimental to your wellbeing?

The term “wellbeing” covers several aspects of the way people feel about their lives, including their jobs, and their relationships with the people around them. Of course, a person’s wellbeing is to do with their own character and home or social life along with their career, but research shows that employers can have an influence on an individual’s sense of wellbeing in the way they run a company.

Healthy and well-motivated employees can have a positive impact on the productivity and effectiveness of a business. Recent studies suggest improvement in employees’ wellbeing will result in improved workplace performance: in profitability (financial performance), labour productivity and the quality of outputs or services. Job satisfaction – including aspects such as satisfaction with training, skills development opportunities, how much autonomy employees have in their role, and how much scope they have to use their own initiative and influence decisions – show a strong and positive link with workplace performance.

Of course it is also well documented that having a dog in the office relieves stress. Apparently not when I’m messing around in the paper recycling box!

Does your company look after your employees wellbeing?

If you want to find out how That Little Agency can help your company’s performance, just drop us a line. After all, much of our best work has started with a cup of tea and a biscuit.

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Planning and briefing your careers website https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/planning-and-briefing-your-careers-website/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 07:41:35 +0000 https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/?p=5125 So you’re planning your new careers website or developing your existing one. Then this little article is for you. An article of briefing your careers website. No pressure, but your...

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So you’re planning your new careers website or developing your existing one. Then this little article is for you. An article of briefing your careers website. No pressure, but your careers website is probably going to be the first place that a job seeker is going to come into contact with your employer brand. So it needs to make a strong, positive first impression. And it’s the best weapon in your recruitment arsenal. So it needs to meet your needs and the needs of the modern job seeker.

We’ve spoken before about how to spot whether your careers website it looking a little tired, so it’s only fair that we should share what you should look for in a new one. Plus a few tips on what to include in your brief for a new one. After all, that’s what we do.

So, are you sitting comfortably? Then let us begin.

Firstly, are you ready for a careers website?

A little reflection is a key part of the process. Before you go into building mode, have you thought about the most important question of all? What are you going to say? Why should people choose to work for you instead of somewhere else?

You might know the answer to this question of course. But if you don’t, then it is worth researching and defining your employer value proposition. Because this will help you shape the messaging on your site.  It will also influence the creative process when designing your careers site. Find out a little bit more about how we can help you define your employer value proposition.

Secondly, identify and engage the stakeholders

I know this sounds like I’m slowing you down even more, but it’s easy to get excited about a shiny new website and go racing ahead. The truth is, there’ll be people in your business, and probably suppliers too, who’ll need to be involved. Get them on board now – not later when you might be forced to retro-fit their needs.

Assuming you’re a talent, recruitment or resourcing manager, your typical stakeholders are your marketing and brand department, IT, whoever runs your main corporate site, your ATS provider (if you have one) and don’t forget the rest of your resourcing team who will all have ideas to share. And the HR Director might just want to get involved too, if only to sign-off on the project.

Thirdly, create your brief

Whoever you work with to build it (more on that later) will want a brief. What’s more, writing a brief is a very handy process to clarify your thoughts and create something all stakeholders can sign-off on. If you’ve done your thinking about your employer value proposition, you’ll be able to include a steer on your messaging and you may even have a creative approach in place.

Details to include in your brief will certainly include information about your business and your target audience. In this respect a careers website is very similar to other sites except that this time the customer is the candidate. Your site builder will want to know about your values as an organisation, what you are there to achieve, why people will want to work for you and your target audience itself, their likely values and motivations. Your earlier conversations with your stakeholders will have added other items to your wish list.

We have created a handy careers website briefing form. If you’d like us to send you a copy, please get in touch.

Fourthly, make sure you’re set-up for Google for Jobs

You’ve probably heard about Google for Jobs by now – especially if you’ve read our earlier articles. But what has been ‘coming soon’ is now here, live and working in the UK. Being found in Google is essential for any website but the listings within a careers website have to be found and show up well in Google for Jobs especially.

It’s Google’s search box for jobs and it’s where your roles really have to be. To show up there, your job adverts need to be coded in a specific way. Our article covers everything you wanted to know about Google for Jobs and there’s a nice little free guide to download too.

Fifthly (is that right?), it has to work across all devices

This is really important. 45% of job seekers search for jobs daily on their mobile device so that’s a huge number to miss if your site isn’t mobile or tablet friendly. The fact that your organisation might be largely PC based and run on Windows doesn’t matter – you need to think externally and about the job seeker.

So, include in your brief that you want the site to work on mobile and tablet as well as desktop. Whatever device the candidates use, the experience should be as rich and engaging as possible.

Sixthly (this is getting ridiculous) deliver content in an interesting and engaging way

Not only must it work across all devices, so must the content – and in a way that holds the candidates attention. Designing for mobile is also a great way of disciplining yourself to think ‘less is more’. The objective is to ’show, not tell’ the reasons why they should work for you. So the design has to be interesting, without too many long chunks of text.

That means imagery, interactive elements and of course film. Film is an incredibly effective way of delivering key content, whether it be messages from senior management or profiles of current employees. So your brief might ask for evidence of any previous experience of making career based film.

Seventhly (do you ever wish you hadn’t started something?), be authentic

Whatever you do, don’t use photography that isn’t authentic. The days of stock shots are long gone and any candidate will be able to spot them a mile off – as will your existing people who might be a tad embarrassed. So use your own people in videos and photos, it’s a must. Creating your own photography and film is an essential investment to deliver the authentic careers website experience that will attract the right candidates.

Eighthly (really?), make the jump to the ATS as seamless as possible

The ideal outcome from a visit to your careers website is an application from the kind of candidate you are looking for. They might not apply first time – they could well be checking out your content and having a look at your social media (more about that next) but eventually, you’ll want them to apply. Obvious really. But that’s when things can go pear shaped.

If your ATS experience looks and feels nothing like your careers site it can completely kill the candidate’s experience of your employer brand. It’s like going from a warm room at a party to the cold outdoors. We’ve worked with many applicant tracking systems and know how to make the integration smooth and seamless – and to ensure a consistent look and feel throughout the whole candidate journey.

Ninthly (I’m not even sure that’s a word), support it with a social media strategy

There’s more to a social media strategy for a careers site than having sharing buttons on every page – although sharing tools are a good thing of course. Social media is where your audience are talking and it’s where trust and engagement is built. It offers huge reach, attracts passive as well as active candidates and enables real-time and quicker recruitment. So your brief should ask for experience of being able to create an engaging social media strategy – and preferably for a careers site.

Finally, who do you choose to help you build it?

Forgive us for putting ourselves at the top of the list here in our own article. We build careers sites. It’s what we specialise in. We know all the do’s and don’ts and all the techie things that careers sites need to work. We believe that it’s a specialist field. And while you don’t have to use us – we’d like to think you’d bear us in mind.

You might have the resources in-house, you might have a great relationship with your existing recruitment marketing agency, you might have a digital agency who just happens to have built a careers site you like. Whoever you use, you’ll have to feel comfortable with their ability and have a good rapport with their team as you’ll be spending a lot of time together – we know!

If you feel that you’d like some help, support or even a little chat around building your next careers website or any aspect of your talent attraction strategy just drop us a line. After all, much of our best work has started with a cup of tea and a biscuit.

 

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Ted Talks: Sun, sea and sand https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/the-value-of-holidays/ Wed, 08 Aug 2018 07:54:31 +0000 https://www.thatlittleagency.co.uk/?p=5024 … or in my case sleeping, squirrels and sausages! We all look forward to a well-earned rest, even me. But what if you’re self-employed? Can you ever really get away...

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… or in my case sleeping, squirrels and sausages!

We all look forward to a well-earned rest, even me. But what if you’re self-employed? Can you ever really get away from it all?  If you’re one of the UK’s 4.6 million self-employed people, can you really afford to take a break? Or will time away simply lead to loss of work? But what are the true value of holidays?

Self-employed people typically take just 14 days of holiday a year and one in eight take no days off at all. Research shows that most people who chose to become self-employed did so in the belief they will have a better work-life balance, but 27 per cent say they now work even longer hours.

Can I afford to take a break?

After taking months, even years, to build up a good reputation and solid client base, stepping away from the coal face can be tough. But by far the biggest issue is finance. For most freelancers, if you don’t work, you don’t get paid. Taking a holiday also risks taking you out of the marketplace temporarily, so you could also lose out on future projects.

For that reason, it’s no surprise that a UK-based study shows one in four freelance workers take no annual holiday at all. Of those who do, 45% take their work with them. How many of you receive emails on holiday that start with ‘I know you’re on holiday but…’?

Why should I take a break?

Taking a holiday isn’t for everyone. Some are quite happy working 52 weeks a year. That’s fine – you’re self-employed, you can do what you want.

But equally the health benefits of a well-planned break are numerous – lower blood pressure, improved sleep, refreshed mind and reduced stress. The getaway may even give you a chance to reflect on your career, or how you wouldn’t be where you are today without your dog. No? Just a thought!!

If you want to find out how happy employees can help you become a destination employer, reduce recruitment costs and improve retention, give me or Mark a call on 07922 438445 or email mark@thatlittleagency.co.uk.  We’d love to have a chat.

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